South Eastern Kenya University has started the mass production of N95 facemasks and Hand sanitizers to help in fighting the spread of COVID-19.seku news 1The Clothing and Textile Department has been working tirelessly to produce the masks with some of them already in use by members of staff.The disposable masks create a physical barrier between the mouth and nose of the wearer and contaminants in the immediate environment.
The N95 masks have the highest COVID-19 protection level with 95 percent virus protection, and 100 percent bacteria, dust and pollen efficacy. seku news 2The masks, which are made from non-woven fabric, light poly-poplin and medium poly-poplin fabric, with non-woven strip, will be used by the staff of the University with a surplus for supply to the surrounding community.
The Department of Physical Sciences also recently embarked on production of Hand sanitizers after an approval was given by the Kenya National Bureau of Statistics . The sanitizers are a supplement or alternative to hand washing with soap and water.


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South Eastern Kenya University has started the production of personal protective equipment to combat the spread of the novel COVID-19.
On Wednesday, the University’s School of Engineering and Technology rolled out the production of face masks, which have been billed as one of the main preventive of the global pandemic.
According to the dean, the School’s Clothing and Textile Department has a production capacity for 300 N9% masks per day at the Main Campus in Kitui.
The N95 masks have the highest COVID-19 protection level with 95 percent virus protection, and 100 percent efficacy on bacteria, dust and pollen. According to Eng. Kioko, the masks, which are made from non-woven fabric, light poly-poplin a n d medium poly-poplin fabric, with non-woven strip, will be used by the staff of the University with a surplus for supply to the surrounding community. While announcing the break through on Wednesday this week, Vice-Chancellor, Prof. Geoffrey Muluvi, said that “universities exist to solve problems facing the people. We are now making our rightful contribution.” He urged other schools and departments of the University to come up with innovative ways to respond to “this global problem.”
Eng. Kioko said the School is also looking into the possibilities of designing and producing electric incinerators for disposal.


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Members of University of Embu led by their Chairperson, Ms. Caroline Chepkemoi visited SEKU to learn and interact with different units on the running and management of students’ academic affairs, support and welfare services. Our students’ Governing Council also had an opportunity to learn from the interaction.

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The Vice-Chancellor, Prof. Geoffrey Muluvi poses for a photo with the team from University of Embu and staff and students from SEKU.

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The Vice-Chancellor, Prof. Geoffrey Muluvi, with some members of the University of Embu students Governing Council

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The Vice-Chancellor, Prof. Muluvi and the Dean of Students, Prof. Njoka and other members of staff from University of Embu.

That vile message you post on a social media platform in the heat of the moment could lead to someone’s death, and land you in jail.
We live in a world where the technology has greatly advanced over the years and we currently even have machine to machine (M2M) communication, a technology through which one machine communicates with another and almost everyone has access to the devices.
There are several forms of cybercrimes, including hacking, identity theft, scamming, spamming, stalking, software piracy and cyber bullying, according to Dr. Makau Mutua, a senior information and communication technology lecturer at Meru University of Science and Technology.


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Dr. Makau Mutua

seku Staff

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Introduction

  • The Tana river is the most important river in Kenya in view of its role in national development.
  • Five HEP dams in the Upper Tana Basin - Kindaruma, Kiambere, Kamburu, Gitaru and Masinga.
  • The Masinga Dam is the most significant in terms of regulating the hydrology of the Tana river due to its size.
  • Studies on the effects of soil erosion and impacts in the Upper Tana Basin (e.g. Dunne and Ongwenyi, 1976; Ongwenyi, 1978; Edwards, 1979; Ongwenyi, 1985; Brown et
    al., 1996; Schneider and Brown, 1998; Pacini et al., 1998; Maingi and Marsh, 2001; Maingi and Marsh, 2002).
  • Studies on the effects of landuse change and water abstraction on streamflow in the Upper Tana basin (Njogu et al., 2018) and Mwendwa et al 2019).
  • Studies on the environmental impacts of the hydrologic alterations of the flow of the Tana river on the riverine forests (Pacini et al., 1998; Maingi and Marsh, 2001; Maingi
    and Marsh, 2002).
  • Few studies on the hydrology of the Tana river in the Lower Tana Basin (Kitheka et al., 2003 and 2005)

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